Window and Door Drafts Affect Energy Efficiency

 

Frigid weather in Wisconsin is hard enough without having a draft around a window or a door that causes heat to escape. Drafts mean more heating expenses, and that can put a chill on your finances if you’re not careful. Improving energy efficiency is a must. The best option to improve this situation is to replace leaking windows and doors with energy-efficient products. According to the Department of Energy, heating costs are the most significant expense for homeowners and can be greatly reduced with proper insulation and quality windows and doors.

Not only that, but, Remodeling Magazine’s Cost vs. Value Report for 2017 claims an average ROI for replacement windows and doors is between 70-80% upon resale. There are some factors to consider when choosing new windows or doors such as frame type, glazing type, color, and energy performance rating.

 

What is The Energy Performance Rating?

 

The Energy Performance Rating is a regulated by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) who tests, rates, certifies and labels windows and doors based on their performance rating. Ratings for such things as the U-Factor are labeled and help to inform purchasers how energy efficient a product is. To learn more about the Energy Performance Rating, you can visit https://energy.gov/energysaver/windows-doors-and-skylights/energy-performance-ratings-windows-doors-and-skylights.

 

 

What types of windows are energy efficient?

 

Most traditional styles of a window are now energy efficient including awning, hopper, sliding, fixed, double-hung, and casement.  Each type must be installed appropriately and air sealed to prevent leakage and to ensure energy efficiency. How the window is installed depends on several factors such as the type of window, the construction type of the house ( brick, stone, wood, etc.), the exterior cladding, and any weather-restrictive barrier.

 

High Quality Contracting Inc. works with several vendors including custom window options so we can replace any window type that you may need.

 

What about storm windows? Will that help my bottom line?

 

Not really, unless your window is broken, missing glass or has a sever leak problem, a storm window is not made to reduce energy loss. Seeing significant annual savings on your energy bill is highly unlikely.

 

What types of doors are energy efficient?

 

Just as with windows, doors also receive an Energy Efficiency Rating that can help you choose the right product. Styles also vary widely and can be matched with the exterior design of your home to create a fabulous focal point.

 

If you are looking for expert advice on what type of windows or doors would be best for your home, contact us today to schedule a consultation.